Communication Matters

Common Communication Difficulties of Stroke Survivors

Jonathan Plessner, CCC-SLP | Posted on September 09, 2018

Suffering from a stroke can be a scary and challenging experience, causing brain damage that may lead to communication difficulties with language, speech, voice, cognition and even swallowing.

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication, Stroke, Voice

Benefits of Accent Modification in the Work Place

  • Do you miss out on career advancement opportunities because of your accent?
  • Do people often ask you to repeat yourself?
  • Do you avoid speaking in English because you are afraid to make mistakes?
  • Do you struggle to communicate at parties or social events?

Regardless of your native language, an accent can make it harder for others to understand you and cause frustration. An accent modification program can reduce communication breakdowns, enhancing both your clarity and confidence.

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication

Make Book Reading Interactive

Anne M. Calic MA CCC-SLP | Posted on September 09, 2018

Reading books with your preschooler is one of the best ways to increase language and pre-literacy skills.  Language skills include listening (comprehending or understanding of concepts) and speaking (expressing thoughts, ideas, concepts, and feelings). Pre-literacy skills are those behaviors associated with successful reading development and include strong vocabulary and narrative skills, interest in books, print awareness, and phonological awareness. Some phonological awareness tasks for a preschool-aged child are rhyming, segmenting and blending syllables into words, and identifying beginning and ending sounds in words.

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication, Learning

12 Commonly-Used Speech Therapy Terms

Megan Ahlman, M.A. CCC-SLP | Posted on August 08, 2018

Learn some general terms used by Speech Language Pathologists that will help you during your therapy visit.

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication

Pre-Literacy Skills for Preschoolers

Megan Ahlman, M.A. CCC-SLP | Posted on August 08, 2018

Children ages 3-5 are considered to be preschool-age. During this time, it is important to lay a strong foundation of language and literacy skills. Early exposure to a variety of language concepts and literacy themes can prepare your child for success in preschool and ensure they have adequate time to master skills that will help them to thrive in kindergarten.

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Tags: Speech, Communication, reading, literacy, Learning

Understanding Your Child’s Lisp

Megan Ahlman, M.A. CCC-SLP | Posted on August 08, 2018

A lisp is one of the most common articulation errors targeted in speech-language therapy. It is a sound substitution or distortion in which the “s” and “z” sounds are produced inefficiently.

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication

Fitting Speech Therapy into Your Busy Schedule

We shuttle our children from soccer to karate to ballet, adding speech therapy to that agenda can seem overwhelming. However, attending and being on time for your scheduled speech therapy sessions is extremely important for your child to learn and use their new speech and language skills. When you remember what a life changing and necessary skill communicating effectively is, it will be easier to make it a priority! Be sure to schedule the therapy on a day when you can consistently be there at the same time each week. Ask for carpooling help if needed and don’t schedule other appointments during that time. The more sessions that your child misses, the longer he/she will have to attend therapy. If you can’t make it to an office every week for therapy, consider telepractice! Telepractice is a method for receiving speech-language pathology services using a computer or iPad instead of in-office appointments. This can be done from any location and may be a convenient option for your busy family. 

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication

My one year old hasn’t said their first word yet. Should I be concerned?

Megan Ahlman, M.A. CCC-SLP | Posted on July 07, 2018

It is true – a child’s first words are typically formed around the age of one. Common first words include names of familiar people, favorite foods or toys, common verbs, ‘yes/no’ and ‘please.’ However, not all children begin using words by their first birthday. There are a couple of things to consider if you or your pediatrician are keeping a watchful eye on your child’s communication skills. By the age of one, your child should have certain skills that will help him/her transition into verbal communication.

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Tags: Speech, Communication

10 Tips for Parents of Children Who Have Just Started Talking

Michelle Foye, MA CCC-SLP | Posted on May 05, 2018

Presented by Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center & The Hanen Centre

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication

Yanny or Laurel? It's your brain not your ears that decides

Dr. Jennell C. Vick | Posted on May 05, 2018
Jennell Vick, Case Western Reserve University

As a speech scientist, I never thought I’d see so much excitement on social media about one tiny little word.

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication