Communication Matters

10 Signs Your Child May Have Hearing Loss

Laura L. Brady, AuD, CCC-A | Posted on March 03, 2019
  1. “Huh? What Did You Say?”
    As parents, we all know that hearing and LISTENING are not the same. But, if it seems your child is experiencing hearing issues, even when it appears he/she is listening well, you should ask your child’s physician for an in-office hearing test or referral.
  1. Failed School Screening
    School-aged children routinely have vision and hearing screenings conducted at school. Generally, parents are NOT notified unless there is a concern. If you receive a notice from your child’s school that he/she did not pass the hearing screening, please follow-up as the notice recommends. 
  1. Teacher’s Report— Part I
    Let’s face it, teachers spend A LOT of time with our children and are likely the first to notice if your child is experiencing hearing issues. Though, at times, it can be difficult to separate attention/focus from actual hearing ability, if your child’s teacher shares a concern, you should have it checked out. 
  1. Teacher’s Report— Part II
    Have you noticed a sudden drop in your child’s grades? Listening can be a tiring task when struggling with hearing. It can be easy for your child to “tune out” the teacher’s lessons, which can then impact his/her grades.  
  1. “Why Is That Television So LOUD?”
    Many kids like to raise the volume of the television. For some shows, like cartoons, it can make them seem more exciting and fun, but it could also be a sign that your child is experiencing hearing issues. If your child insists that he/she cannot hear the television at a level that you believe is typical, consider getting your child’s hearing tested. 
  1. “Inside Voice, Please!”
    Some hearing problems interfere with our ability to monitor the volume of our own voice. If your child seems to be talking either too loudly (or too softly), consider having his/her hearing checked. 
  1. Recent Upper Respiratory Infection, Colds, Allergies, Flu
    Anything that causes swelling in the back of the nose/throat area can cause secondary problems with middle ear health and hearing. Even if there is no fever or pain, your child could still have trouble hearing. If your child recently had a bad cold and, a couple of weeks later, seems to not be hearing well, have it checked.   
  1. “I’m Hearing a Funny Sound!”
    If a child reports any unusual noises in their head or ears (a ringing, rushing, roaring, beeping, hissing, etc.), particularly after being exposed to loud sound, have his/her hearing checked. 
  1. Eagle Eyes
    Children are marvelously adaptable to using what senses they can to figure out what’s going on and communicate! If you notice that your child seems unusually attentive to visual information and watching the faces of people speaking, have his/her hearing checked. 
  1. “I Thought You Said…”
    Does your child seem to mishear or misunderstand what was said? Some hearing problems are subtle and can interfere with hearing certain speech sounds. If this is happening, consider a hearing test.

Learn more about having your hearing tested

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Tags: Communication, Hearing, Teens, Hearing Loss

How to Prepare for an Upcoming Speech-Language Evaluation

Megan Ahlman, M.A. CCC-SLP | Posted on December 12, 2018

A speech and language evaluation is a normal avenue to pursue when parents or caregivers suspect difficulty with communication. Anticipation of a speech and language evaluation can bring on feelings of stress if you aren’t sure what to expect, and meeting a new health-care professional in an unfamiliar office space can be overwhelming.

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication, Teens, Voice, toddler, talking

Great Apps to Practice Speech Sounds with Your Tween

Learning and practicing how to correctly produce their “r” or “s” sound is certainly NOT what 8-12-year-olds want to be doing! Most would prefer to be playing video games or riding their bike.  One way to make speech therapy and at-home practice a little easier is to use an app. These apps could be on the parent’s phone, the tween’s phone, or a family iPad.

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication, Teens, Stuttering, Learning, Voice, talking

10 Reasons to Visit the Community Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Samantha Taylor | Posted on August 08, 2018

There are countless reasons why the Community Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (CCDHH) is a wonderful resource for Deaf individuals as well as those who want to learn more about Deaf culture.

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Tags: Language, Communication, Teens, Support, Deaf, Hard of Hearing, Hearing Loss, American Sign Language, Interpreting, ASL Interpreter, ASL, Learning

What is Stuttering and How is it Treated?

Lauren Masuga, M.A., CCC-SLP | Posted on February 02, 2018

Stuttering is a communication disorder in which the flow of speech is broken by repetitions (li-li-like this), prolongations (lllllike this), or abnormal stoppages (no sound) of sounds and syllables. There may also be unusual facial and body movements associated with the effort to speak.

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication, Teens, Stuttering

FACEtime for Teens Who Stutter

Lauren Masuga, M.A., CCC-SLP | Posted on February 02, 2018

The Speech Language Pathologists at Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center (CHSC) are experts with children and teenagers who stutter.  As defined by The Stuttering Foundation, “Stuttering is a communication disorder in which the flow of speech is broken by repetitions (li-li-like this), prolongations (lllllike this), or abnormal stoppages (no sound) of sounds and syllables”. Over 3 million Americans stutter, including well known people such as Ed Sheeran, Emily Blunt, Darren Sproles, and Tiger Woods. CHSC has developed a therapy program called FACEtime: Fluency Attitude and Communication Effectiveness.  FACEtime is a program designed for older children and young teens who stutter and want to communicate more fluently and confidently.

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Tags: Speech, Communication, Teens, Stuttering

Sound Choices for Kids & Teens

Dr. Laura Brady | Posted on November 11, 2017

According to the National Center of Disease Statistics, 5.2 million children between the ages of 6-19 years have hearing loss directly related to noise exposure.

CHSC is proud to announce that our Sound Choices program is now available to the public.

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Tags: Audiology, Hearing, Hearing Loss Prevention, Teens