Communication Matters

Summer Activities to Practice Word-Finding for Those with Aphasia

Alicia Verhovitz, M.A., CCC-SLP | Posted on June 06, 2022

Communicating with someone recovering from a stroke or maintaining skills after a neurodegenerative diagnosis may be difficult. Changes in communicative abilities can be either expressive (the ability to speak or communicate) or receptive (the ability to understand spoken or written information), leading to breakdowns in communication. Any changes in communication can lead to feelings of frustration, isolation, or distress. We offer some fun summer activities to help practice word-finding and repair communication breakdowns. These activities require little if any, materials or preparation to engage!

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication, Stroke, Brain Injury, talking, Speech therapy, Stroke recovery, Aphasia

Stroke Recovery: Communication Tips for People with Aphasia

Alicia Verhovitz, M.A., CCC-SLP | Posted on June 06, 2022

Take your time when speaking. Speak at your own pace. Even if your communication partner is speaking quickly, set your pace and take your time. Your message is important and deserves to be heard.

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication, Support, Stroke, Caregiving, Brain Injury, talking, Communication Access, Speech therapy, Stroke recovery

Tips for Communicating with Someone after a Stroke

Alicia Verhovitz, M.A., CCC-SLP | Posted on April 04, 2022

Communicating with someone after they have had a stroke, brain injury, or other illness resulting in communication difficulties can be challenging. These difficulties can be either expressive (the ability to speak or communicate) or receptive (the ability to understand spoken or written information), leading to breakdowns in communication. Any changes in communication can lead to feelings of frustration, isolation, or distress. Making a few changes in the way you communicate can make a world of difference!

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication, Stroke, Caregiving, Brain Injury, talking, Speech therapy, Stroke recovery

Stroke Recovery: After the Hospital

Alicia Verhovitz, M.A., CCC-SLP | Posted on December 12, 2021

Preparing to go home after a hospital stay is never easy, especially after having a stroke. It can be a very overwhelming process with new challenges in thinking, memory, and mobility. The length of your hospital stay after a stroke can range anywhere from a few days to months depending on the severity of the stroke and the support system in place at home. There are many feelings associated with going home, excited to be back home along with feelings of anxiety or worry.  

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication, Support, Stroke, Brain Injury, talking, Speech therapy, Stroke recovery

Stroke Recovery: A Whole Life Approach

Alicia Verhovitz, M.A., CCC-SLP | Posted on October 10, 2021

Welcome to the first of a blog series on stroke recovery resource information from Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center (CHSC). Topics of the series include first action steps following a stroke, benefits of speech therapy, communication strategies, tips for caregivers, and much more.

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication, Support, Stroke, Caregiving, Brain Injury, Voice, talking, Speech therapy, Stroke recovery

Stroke and Depression Connection

After a stroke, the main focus for the patient, their family, friends, physicians, therapists and other health care professionals is often on their physical aspects. How far can the patient walk? Can the patient still get dressed with the use of just one hand? Can the patient safely swallow food and liquid without coughing or choking?  Will the patient need to use oxygen after discharge to home? These are all issues that are visible and obvious.

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Tags: Communication, Support, Stroke, Caregiving, Brain Injury

What Is Dysarthria?

Dysarthria is a motor speech disorder caused by damage to the central or peripheral nervous system – or sometimes both – as the result of a stroke or brain injury. People with dysarthria may have trouble with respiration (breathing), phonation (voicing), articulation (speech), prosody (patterns of stress and intonation) and resonance (e.g., nasality).

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Tags: Speech, Communication, Stroke, talking

What is Aphasia?

Sharon Dundee | Posted on May 05, 2019

Aphasia is a language disorder resulting from an injury to the brain, such as a stroke or head trauma. Aphasia involves varying degrees of communication difficulties in these areas:

Spoken Language Comprehension - otherwise known as “Receptive Language” or “Auditory Comprehension.”

Symptoms may include:

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication, Support, Stroke, Brain Injury, talking

10 Stroke Factors and How to Reduce Your Risk

Stroke is a leading cause of long-term disability in adults, and the fifth leading cause of death in America. Every 40 seconds, someone in the U.S. will experience a stroke, and nearly 800,000 Americans will have a stroke this year alone.

Below are 10 common health factors that attribute to having a stroke and how to reduce your risk of experiencing one:

  1. Hypertension
    Linked to 48% of stroke-related incidents
    Hypertension is the single most modifiable risk factor. Make sure to have your blood pressure regularly checked!
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Tags: Stroke

Stroke Survival: When Speech and Language are Affected

Sharon Dundee | Posted on March 03, 2019

What is a stroke?

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication, Stroke, Learning, Voice, talking

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