Communication Matters

Will Accent Modification Diminish My Identity?

Learning the rules of English will not erase your accent but will make it easier for others to understand you. Your identity will not, and cannot, be diminished. However, accent modification training can, and will, expand your abilities and allow you to communicate optimally.

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication, Learning, talking, Accent Modification

10 Tips for Working with an Interpreter

Jordan Brian, Sign Language Interpreter | Posted on January 01, 2019

If you’ve never worked with a Sign Language interpreter before, you may not be aware of how to prepare for and conduct yourself during this interaction. Don’t worry – below are several guidelines that will help make a positive experience for you, the interpreter, and most importantly, the Deaf or Hard of Hearing (HoH) individual. 

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Tags: Communication, Support, Deaf, Hard of Hearing, American Sign Language, Interpreting, ASL Interpreter, ASL

Access to Services is Crucial for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Casey Ring, CCDHH Learning Center Manager | Posted on January 01, 2019

The loss of the ability to communicate can mean a loss of quality of life, especially for those who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing (HoH). The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) protects the civil rights of all Americans, regardless of ability, by requiring businesses and organizations to offer reasonable accommodations that allow for effective communication. For Deaf/HoH people, this could mean anything from captioning, texting, video relay services, or sign language interpreting services, dependent on the individual. The vision of Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center (CHSC) is a community where everyone communicates effectively.

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Tags: Communication, Support, Deaf, Hard of Hearing, American Sign Language, Interpreting, ASL Interpreter, ASL

When and How Should I Read to My Child?

Akilah Porter | Posted on January 01, 2019

Experts recommend you read to your child as often as you can and that you strive to have at least one scheduled reading time each day. Choosing regular times to read (especially before naps and bedtime) is a way to help your child learn to sit with a book and relax. But you can read anytime your child seems in the mood.

If your toddler will let you, hold him or her in your lap when you read. It's a great spot for:

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication, literacy, Learning, Voice, toddler, talking

The Stages of Infant Speech Development

Akilah Porter | Posted on January 01, 2019

Children begin developing speech as an infant. By 6 months, babies coo and play with their voices by producing sounds such as "oo," "uh," "mm," "da," and "goo." Children learn speech by imitating the sounds they hear. Actions such talking about what you are doing during the day, singing songs and reading books expose your child to a variety of sounds that he or she will begin imitating.

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication, Voice, talking

Can You Understand Your Child's Speech?

Sharon Dundee | Posted on January 01, 2019

It’s common for most children to make some mistakes as they learn to say new words. Different sounds are mastered at different ages. Consistent, correct sound production will vary from child to child. When mistakes continue past a certain age, that’s when it's considered a speech sound disorder. Speech sound disorders include problems with articulation (pronouncing sounds correctly) and phonological processes (errors with sound patterns).

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication, Voice, toddler, talking

Why Should I Read to My Toddler?

Sharon Dundee | Posted on January 01, 2019

Reading aloud is an important way to help your child make the transition from infancy into their toddler years. Between the ages of 1 and 3, your child will have triumphs and challenges. Studies show that children with an active exposure to language have social and educational advantages over their peers - and reading is one of the best ways to expose your child to language.

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication, reading, literacy, Learning, toddler

How Hearing Loss Affects Speech-Language Development

Sharon Dundee | Posted on January 01, 2019

Children learn to talk by listening to those around them. The first few years of life are a critical time for speech and language development. Children must be able to hear speech clearly in order to learn language. Fluctuating hearing loss due to repeated ear infections might mean the child doesn't hear consistently and may be missing out on critical speech information. Permanent hearing loss will also affect speech and language development, especially if it is not detected early. The earlier hearing loss is identified and treated, the more likely the child will develop speech and language skills on par with children who aren’t experiencing hearing issues.

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Tags: Speech, Hearing Aid, Hearing Aids, Communication, Hearing, Deaf, Hard of Hearing, Hearing Loss, Learning, Voice, toddler, talking

Are Speech Disorders Inherited?

Megan Ahlman, M.A. CCC-SLP | Posted on December 12, 2018

Evidence exists linking genetic factors to a variety of speech and language difficulties. Recent studies of molecular genetics and neuroimaging are cross-disciplinary, combining forces between speech-language pathologists, physicians, and scientists. Researchers have already identified over 400 genes linked to hearing loss, and ongoing studies investigate genetic links to stuttering, voice disorders, and language disorders.

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication, Stuttering, talking

Benefits of Lullabies for Babies

Laura L. Brady, AuD, CCC-A | Posted on December 12, 2018

Music is hard wired in our brains at an early age. The ability to process music appears in specialized areas of the brain during the first few months after birth. It socially connects, communicates, coordinates and instigates neurological and physical movement, stimulates pleasure senses and hormones, alters perception, and shapes personal identities. 

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Tags: Language, Communication, Hearing

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