Communication Matters

Speech-Language Concerns? Don't Wait - Evaluate!

“They’re still young - let’s just wait and see.” Coming from a pediatrician, this phrase holds a lot of power over parents worried about their child’s speech and language skills. The parents may have expressed a concern that their two-year-old hasn't started talking yet, is only saying a few words, or is very hard to understand. When the pediatrician brushes it off as not a big deal, the natural response from parents is to trust someone they consider an expert.

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication, toddler, talking, Early Intervention

Tinnitus and COVID-19

Laura L. Brady, AuD, CCC-A | Posted on March 03, 2021

It is estimated that around 15% of Americans experience tinnitus. Tinnitus is described differently by different people. It has been described as a ringing, chirping, rushing air “whooshing” noise, hissing, or whining sound. No matter the description, it is a sound perceived in the head or ears without a true external environmental cause of sound being present. Often, people downplay tinnitus and consider it a mild inconvenience. Others are impacted much more seriously. If you only experience mild symptoms from time to time, you may learn to live with it. But if your tinnitus affects you on a daily basis, it can have an impact on your quality of life. 

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Tags: Hearing Aid, Audiology, Hearing Aids, Hearing, Hearing Loss Prevention, Hard of Hearing, Hearing Loss, "tinnitus", "ears", earplugs, Ear Pain, Ear Anatomy, Cochlear Implants, Ear Wax

Ear Wax – Cleaning, Removal, and Hearing Loss

Laura L. Brady, AuD, CCC-A | Posted on March 03, 2021

Earwax or cerumen (from the Latin word "cera” meaning wax) is a normal, natural, necessary substance produced by the human ear. It is a sticky golden-colored substance produced by the outer cartilaginous third of the ear canal and it contains naturally occurring proteins that inhibit fungal and bacterial growth and keeps the sensitive skin of the ear canal lubricated and healthy. Earwax also helps trap dust and dirt and other foreign objects from entering the ear.

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Tags: Hearing Aid, Audiology, Hearing Aids, Communication, Hearing, Hearing Loss Prevention, Hard of Hearing, Hearing Loss, "tinnitus", "ears", earplugs, Ear Pain, Ear Anatomy, Ear Wax

5 Tips for Better Hearing When Watching TV

Laura L. Brady, AuD, CCC-A | Posted on March 03, 2021

Many people with hearing loss struggle to hear and understand the dialogue on television shows. A common comment from loved ones is that the television volume is louder than they prefer. Sadly, this sometimes leads to people isolating to different rooms to watch what they want at a volume that is comfortable.

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Tags: Hearing Aid, Audiology, Hearing Aids, Communication, Hearing, Hearing Loss Prevention, Hard of Hearing, Hearing Loss

Baby Sign Language Improves Communication

Laura L. Brady, AuD, CCC-A | Posted on March 03, 2021

Infant sign language really does deliver on its promise of improved communication. This is particularly appealing for new parents, given that there’s a well-recognized gap between what babies and toddlers want to say and what they are able to say. Sign language can help ease frustration between ages 8 months and 2 years — when children begin to know what they want, need, and feel but don't always have the oral motor verbal skills to express themselves. Basic sign language can help babies better express themselves as early as 8 or 9 months and it can mean decreased frustration (for both caregiver and child), promote earlier language skills and enhanced bonding with those who sign.

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication, American Sign Language, ASL, Learning, toddler, talking, Early Intervention, Communication Access, Baby Sign Language

Inspiration: A Century of Service at Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center

Jennell C. Vick, Ph.D., CCC-SLP | Posted on February 02, 2021

2021: A Century of Serving Northeast Ohio!

I couldn’t be prouder to lead an organization with a legacy and mission that have stood the test of time. Looking back, there is so much about our story that inspires me. This will be the first in a series of reflections to bring you along on the century-long journey of Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center (CHSC). As you read along, I hope you will share in my sense of awe and wonder as we embark on our second century of serving Northeast Ohio.

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Tags: Hearing Aid, Audiology, Language, Hearing Aids, Communication, Hearing, Hearing Loss Prevention, Deaf, Hard of Hearing, Hearing Loss, Cochlear Implants, Deafness, Early Intervention, Communication Access

New Accessibility Feature on iOS14 for Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Laura L. Brady, AuD, CCC-A | Posted on January 01, 2021

With the latest iOS 14 update comes a new feature, which can be valuable to ALL users, but particularly for those who are hearing impaired or deaf.

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Tags: Hearing Aid, Audiology, Hearing Aids, Hearing, Deaf, Hard of Hearing

Benefits of Wearing Hearing Aids Every Day

Laura L. Brady, AuD, CCC-A | Posted on January 01, 2021

We are often asked “I’m home alone - do I really need to wear my hearing aids?” The quick answer is YES! We encourage our patients to wear their devices as much as possible every day. Below are some of the reasons, supported by science.

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Tags: Hearing Aid, Audiology, Hearing Aids, Hearing, Hard of Hearing, Hearing Loss

International Stuttering Awareness Day

Sharon Dundee | Posted on October 10, 2020

October 22nd is International Stuttering Awareness Day. Stuttering affects more than 70 million people worldwide - which is about 1% of the population. In the United States, that's over 3 million Americans who stutter. Approximately 5 percent of all children go through a period of stuttering that lasts six months or more. Three-quarters of those will recover by late childhood, leaving about 1% with a long-term problem. The best prevention tool is early intervention, and Gabby’s story is a perfect example…

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What is Dyslexia and How is It Treated?

Michelle Foye, MA CCC-SLP | Posted on September 09, 2020

Dyslexia is a specific learning disability that is neurological in origin. It is characterized by difficulties with accurate and/or fluent word recognition and by poor spelling and decoding abilities. These difficulties typically result from a deficit in the phonological component of language that is often unexpected in relation to other cognitive abilities and the provision of effective classroom instruction. Secondary consequences may include problems in reading comprehension and reduced reading experience that can impede growth of vocabulary and background knowledge.

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Tags: Speech, Language, Communication, literacy, Wilson Reading Program, Learning, Dyslexia

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